Lobster Information you might find interesting !!

Did you know that…

CANADIAN LOBSTER SEASON  starts from April 20 to July 15

The largest lobster ever caught was reported to be approximately 44 pounds and up to 65 years old (wow!). Scientists believe that lobsters do not get old and could potentially live indefinitely, since their organs do not degenerate. Some feel that the longevity of lobsters is only limited to predation.

No pain! The Atlantic Lobster does not feel pain when he immersed into hot water due to its decentralized nervous system (it has no brain, just a series of ganglia).

Steam scream! The Atlantic Lobster does not have any vocal cords and contrary to rumor it does not scream. The sound we hear when boiling lobster is only the steam escaping from the shell.

Right clawed versus left clawed. The lobster has two different type of claws, the crusher claw and the pincer claw. If you examine a lobster, you will find that some have their crusher claw on the right side while others have it on the left.

Hard shelled versus soft shelled. Since the Atlantic Lobster must moult (shed its shell) in order to grow, it will display a thinner softer shell after it has molted. In Canada, the lobster season is staggered around the summer moulting period and most Canadian Atlantic Lobster are harvested hard-shelled.

Moulting is done through out the life of the lobster to enable it to grow. During its first year a lobster will molt as many as 10 times. Lobsters will continue to molt approximately once a year until maturity. Older lobsters may molt only once every two to three years.

It takes a lobster six to eight years to reach a market weight of approximately 1 pound. Lobsters grow quicker in warmer water and can achieve market weights in less time.

Regenerating limbs. Also known as autotomy, lobsters can regenerate appendages lost to predation. This would include their claws, legs, antennules and antennae. Sometimes, for no apparent reason, lobsters will also drop a claw.

Hard-shell Nutrition. While hard-shell lobster meat is considered to be the tastiest, it is also proves to be the most nutritious. Soft-shelled lobsters lose nutrients as part of the moulting process and absorb considerable amounts of water. Hard-shelled Canadian Atlantic Lobster maintains all of its nutrition and provides the healthiest choice for consumers.

The natural colour of a Canadian Atlantic Lobster will vary from blue-green to a rusty brown and can even be found with a blue or white (albino) shell. They will all turn red when cooked (except the white shelled lobster) and will afford the same great taste regardless of shell colour.

Multicoloured innards. Lobster meat is generally a delicate white colour. When eating a lobster several other colours will be encountered. The waxy red colour next to the meat is found in female lobsters and is the roe (eggs). Many consider this to be that lobster caviar. The textured green material is referred to as a tomalley and is a fancy name for the liver. Again, many consider this delectable and a tasty part of the lobster experience. The white foamy substance often encountered is the lobsters’ fat and blood and is also edible.

Cannibalistic? Lobsters were once accused of being cannibalistic to their own species because of lobster shell found in their gut. It is now believed that the shell material was simply discarded shell from moulting. While lobsters may scavenge, it has been shown they prefer fresh food, which includes a fish, crabs, muscles and sea urchins.

Lobster teeth. Lobsters do have teeth, however instead of being found in the mouth they are found in the stomach.

To put a lobster to sleep, simply invert it on to its back for a few minutes. Some prefer to do this before placing lobster in the boiling water before cooking.

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